Bush Pickle Cucumber Seeds
Bush Pickle Cucumbers CU5-20

Bush Pickle Cucumber Seeds

Loyalty Points: 75
SKU CU5-20
$4.00 $3.75
Availability: In Stock
Country Of Origin: USA USA
Description
Planting Instructions
Disease Resistant
Customer Reviews
45 days. Cucumis sativus. (F1) Bush Pickle Cucumber. This early maturing compact plant produces high yields of very flavorful 4 to 5" long green cucumbers. This is one of the best quality varieties for making crisp whole dill pickles. If you make your own pickles, you have to try this variety! This variety was developed specifically for space-saving gardens and containers. An excellent choice for home gardens. Disease Resistant: Ccu, CMV.

Lot No: 10212

Germination: 85%

Test Date: 03/24

Seeds Per Pound: 16,000

Seeds Per Ounce: 1,000

Plant Height: Vine Type Plant

Planting Season: Spring/Late Summer

Sunlight Requirement: Full Sun/Partial Shade

Planting Method: Indoor Sow/Direct Sow



Pickling Cucumbers
Cucumis sativus

 
Seed DepthSoil Temp. for GerminationDays to GerminationSunlight RequirementsPlanting Time
1 1/2"65 F to 75 F 7 to 14 daysFull Sun Spring
USDA Hardiness ZoneSeed SpacingRow SpacingSpace After ThinningDays to Harvest
N/A Hills 18" Apart 7 ft Hills 18" Apart50 - 70 days
Pickling Cucumber Seed Planting Information:

Cucumbers don't do well if roots are disturbed, so it is best to plant seeds directly in the garden. Plant your seeds in soil, 2 to 3 weeks after last frost, when soil and air temperature is at least 60 F. Thin so there are 4 plants per hill. Cucumbers can also be grown in rows instead of hills, spacing 24" apart in rows 24 - 36" apart. Trellised plants can be grown as close as 10" apart. Cucumbers only take 55 to 65 days to maturity, so you can have multiple harvest by growing 2 to 3 weeks apart. Plants grow 1 ft tall and vines spread up to 6 ft.

Warning: Do not plant in cold wet soil or you may experience poor germination!

Soil Requirements:

Requires fertile soil in a well drained location in the garden. Apply much and grass clippings, or straw around base of plant.

Water Requirements:

The soil should be continuously moist. Water well during dry and hot spells. Make sure plants get ½" water per week.

Fertilizer Requirements:

Use RootBlast, Vegetable Alive, and Slow Release Fertilizer when transplanting outdoors. Periodically apply Miracle Gro.

Harvest Tips:

Snip the stems with garden scissors when cucumbers are 2" long for pickling varieties. Harvesting frequently encourages more production. Pick daily to prevent fruit from becoming too large. Over ripe cucumbers will have a bitter taste.


Ccu – Scab

Scientific Name: Cladosporium cucumerinum

Type: Fungus

Scab is a world-wide fungal disease that affects the growth of cantaloupes & melons, cucumbers, gourds, pumpkins, squash, and watermelons. Symptoms include pale green spots appear on the leaves which turn to gray spots and may have a yellow halo surrounding the lesion. The leaves become wrinkled and have ragged holes. The dead leaves crack and eventually fall off the plant. Cucumbers, pumpkins, and squash have sunken spots covered with greenish black velvety fungus. The fungus spores are spread by wind, insects, tools, and workers. The scab fungus overwinters on the seed, in crop debris, and in soil. The infected plants and vegetables should be removed, burned, or tilled in to avoid further infestation. The disease is favorable when temperatures are 59 - 77 F and usually occur when moisture and humidity are very high. Plan on using a 2 year crop rotation and avoid planting in the same location, year after year, as the disease can survive in over winter on crop debris. Proper tillage practices may be helpful in managing the disease. Control weeds, by tilling. Fungicides can help manage the disease. Use drip irrigation instead of overhead sprinklers if possible. Keep the day temperature in the 80's and have proper air circulation in greenhouses. The best option is to use disease resistant varieties.

CMV – Cucumber Mosaic Virus

Type: Virus - Potyvirus

Cucumber Mosaic Virus is a world-wide virus disease that affects the growth of cantaloupes & melons, cucumbers, eggplants, gourds, peppers, pumpkins, spinach, squash, tomatoes, and watermelons. Symptoms include stunted or dwarfed plants, mottling, yellowing, distortion, and wrinkling of the leaves with the edges curling downward, and reduced growth rate and yields. The symptoms on leaves known as "shoestring" effect causes young leaves to appear narrow. The leaves will die and fall off, leaving part or most of the plant bare. The virus causes cucumbers to turn pale and gray, become bumpy and oddly shaped, and have a bitter taste. The virus causes peppers to have severe leaf damage with mosaic and necrotic rings. The peppers may have rings and spots. Tomato plants are usually stunted and have poorly shaped leaves and can cause partial or total crop loss. Plants infected with the virus have little or no marketable fruit. The virus can reduce yields and fruit quality. It is spread by aphids, seeds, and weeds. The virus overwinters in many perennial weeds. The infected plants should be removed to avoid further infestation. This virus cannot live in extremely dry conditions. The disease is favorable when temperatures are 79-89 F when aphid infestation is great. Symptoms usually begin to show in June. Plan on using a 3 year crop rotation and avoid planting in the same location, year after year. Keep the fields weed free as infected perennials can harbor the virus. Proper tillage practices may be helpful in managing the disease. Insecticides for aphids are of limited value to control the disease. Spraying the tomato plants with mineral oil can delay the aphids from spreading the virus.The best option is to use disease resistant varieties.

S - Smut

Scientific Name: Urocystis cepulae or Urocystis colhici

Type: Fungus

Smut is a world-wide soil borne disease that affects the growth of cantaloupes & melons, leeks, onions, and shallots. Smut has not been found in chives and garlic. It is one of the most destructive disease in growing onions in northern parts of the United States. The disease infects plants only when they are seedlings, killing the plants early in the season. Symptoms of smut include black streaks, blisters, or lesions appearing on the young leaves near the bulbs. A black powdery spore mass will be released when the bulbs rupture. Cold damp weather in the spring can make the seedling acceptable to the disease. Once affected by the disease, most of the seedlings will die in 3 to 5 weeks after germination. Infected plants may survive in a weaken condition, but the plant growth will be stunted, and the plant will die slowly. The infected plants should be removed and burned on the spot to avoid further infestation. The disease is also favorable when temperatures are 61-72 F, and usually occur in the spring. If the soil temperature is above 84%, when the seedlings are susceptible to the disease, there is usually no infection. Plan on using a 3 year crop rotation and avoid planting onions in the same location, year after year, as the disease can survive in the soil for a long time, up to 15 years. The smut disease can be transmitted from one field to another by water, by wind, and by farm equipment. Once the soil is infected, only seeds treated with fungicide should be planted. The best option is to use disease resistant varieties.

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