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Giant Marconi Sweet Peppers pk/10

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SKU SP96-10
$2.50
Availability: In Stock
Description
Planting Instructions
Disease Resistant
Customer Reviews
2001 All-America Selections Winner!

72 days. Capsicum annuum. (F1) Plant produces excellent yields of huge 8" long by 3" wide elongated sweet peppers. Peppers turn from green to red when mature. Plant has green stems, green leaves, and white flowers. Used in salads, stir fry, roasting, or stuffed. Plant does well in extreme weather conditions. Always a great seller at Farmer’s Markets! Excellent choice for home gardens and market growers. Disease Resistant: PVY, TMV.

Lot No: 101495583

Germination: 85%

Test Date: 09/17

Seeds Per Pound: 64,000

Plant Height: 30” tall

Planting Season: Spring

Sunlight Requirement: Full Sun

Planting Method: Indoor Sow



Sweet peppers
Capsicum annuum

 
Seed DepthSoil Temp. for GerminationDays to GerminationSunlight RequirementsPlanting Time
1/4" 75 F to 85 F 7 to 14 daysFull Sun Spring
USDA Hardiness ZoneSeed SpacingRow SpacingSpace After ThinningDays to Harvest
N/A 1"36 - 48" 24"60 - 90 days
Sweet Pepper Seed Planting Information:

Sweet peppers can be grown anywhere as long as you have 4 months without frost. You can also grow sweet peppers in containers. Sweet Pepper seeds are sensitive to temperature and moisture. Do not soak the seeds in any type of solution or water before planting, as this may damage the seeds and they may rot and may not germinate. Plant your seeds indoors between January and March, or 5 to 7 weeks before setting outside in garden. Use Miracle Gro Seed Starting Material for best germination results. When plant is 12" or taller, transplant them outdoors. Only plant peppers outdoors on a cloudy day, just prior to getting rain. Plant when soil is warm, at least 2 weeks after last frost, and when temperatures remain above 70 F. Please read the Tips on Growing Hot Peppers as Sweet peppers and hot peppers are grown in relatively the same manner. Plants can grow 3 to 4 ft tall.

Soil Requirements:

Requires fertile soil in a well drained location in the garden. Apply much and grass clippings, or straw around base of plant.

Water Requirements:

Water well with soaker hoses during dry and hot spells.

Fertilizer Requirements:

Use RootBlast, Vegetable Alive, and Slow Release Fertilizer when transplanting outdoors. Apply Miracle Gro every two weeks.

Harvest Tips:

Harvest sweet peppers when they are green or fully mature using a garden scissor so you don't damage the plant. Pick peppers as they mature to encourage new buds to form.


PVY – Potato Virus Y

Type: Virus - Potyvirus

Potato Virus Y is a disease that affects the growth of peppers. Symptoms include green mosaic on leaves, leaf malformation, and leaf mottling. There may be severe stunting of the plants, and sometimes death of plants. The virus can cause substantial crop loss. The virus is transmitted by aphids. The virus survives for long periods in infected weeds. Mild winter temperatures favor survival of the virus, thus the disease can be greater the following spring. The infected plants should be removed and burned to avoid further infestation. Plan on using a 3 year crop rotation and avoid planting in the same location, year after year. Insecticides for aphids early in the season can control the disease. Keep the fields weed free. The best option is to use disease resistant varieties.

TMV – Tobacco Mosaic Virus

Type: Virus - Potyvirus

Tobacco Mosaic Virus is a world-wide virus disease that affects the growth of eggplants, peppers, and tomatoes. Tobacco mosaic virus may cause significant losses in the field and in the greenhouse. The virus does not usually kill the plant, but it does cause damage to flowers, leaves, and the tomato. Symptoms include stunted or dwarfed plants, yellow-green mottling, blistering of the leaves, a light-green and dark-green mosaic pattern on the leaves, leaf distortion and curling of the leaves, fernleafing, and reduced growth rate and yields. Blooms may have brown streaks. Pepper plants may have yellow spotting on the leaves. Slightly sunken brown rings will appear on tomatoes. The virus is spread primarily by mechanical methods. The virus is not spread by aphids. Smokers can infect plants by handling them. Gardeners contaminate the plants when they touch tobacco products or infected plants or weeds and spread the virus to healthy plants. The virus can stay alive in dead plant material for long periods of time. It can survive on infected seeds, plant debris, and even clothing for months or years. Tobacco mosaic is one of the most highly persistent tomato diseases because it can remain viable for many years and is able to withstand high heat. The virus can survive for up to 50 years in dried plant debris. The infected plants should be removed and buried or burned to avoid further infestation. Plan on using a 3 year crop rotation and avoid planting in the same location, year after year. Keep your garden weed free. Wash your hands thoroughly and disinfect tools. Try to avoid smoking while working in the garden. Spraying plants with 20 percent nonfat dry milk has been shown to be somewhat effective in preventing the spread of the virus. The best option is to use disease resistant varieties.

Customer Reviews

Average Rating


by on March 17, 2011

AK KELLEY. WASILLA ALASKA. I live 75 miles north anchorage.this is a zone 4, if your your lucky.i try these peppers in a green house.it was cool and cloudy summer.and i was very surprise just how good they grew.about 8 inches long. they also turned a bright red. the best and larges sweet pepper i have ever grown in alaska.i have pictures of these peppers.i have been gardening in alaska for 32 years now.and what a great surprise. when my friends came bye.they just looked them with big eyes wide open.they are the only sweet peppers i will grow up here for now own.

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by on June 8, 2011

Stuart from Graham, NC..I grew Giant Marconi peppers for the first time last season and everybody just loved them, including myself..The Marconis' were recomended to me by a local greenhouse owner and now everybody is wanting me to grow some more of those "BIG" peppers this season..If you like stuffed or grilled peppers then these are some of the best around.

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