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Merit Corn pk/50

Loyalty Points: 30
SKU CN19-50
$1.50
Availability: In Stock
Description
Planting Instructions
Disease Resistant
Customer Reviews
80 days. Zea mays. (F1) Plant produces good yields of 8 to 9" long ears of yellow corn. The ears have 16 to 18 rows of tender kernels. The silk removes easily from the ears making it a favorite choice. Excellent choice for home gardens and market growers. Disease Resistant: MDMY, SW.

Lot No: 17-3942-Q

Germination: 85%

Test Date: 09/17

Seeds Per Pound: 1,600

Plant Height: 7 to 8 ft tall

Planting Season: Spring/Summer

Sunlight Requirement: Full Sun

Planting Method: Direct Sow



Corn
Zea mays

 
Seed DepthSoil Temp. for GerminationDays to GerminationSunlight RequirementsPlanting Time
1 - 1 1/2"above 60 F 7 to 10 daysFull Sun Spring
USDA Hardiness ZoneSeed SpacingRow SpacingSpace After ThinningDays to Harvest
N/A 8 - 12"36 - 42" 8 - 12"65 - 120 days
Corn Seed Planting Information:

Corn likes hot summers. Corn should be planted in specific patterns and distances, and separated by rows. Plant seeds directly in the garden. Plant your seeds 2 weeks after last frost date and when soil has warmed up. Corn needs warm soil to germinate. The seeds may rot if the soil is too cool. Soil temperature needs to be higher than 60 F. Plant the seeds in blocks of at least 3 rows in each direction as corn is pollinated by the wind. Planting in blocks also protects stalks from damage from high winds. Plants can grow 3 to 8 ft tall.

Warning: Do not plant in cold wet soil or you may experience poor germination!

Soil Requirements:

Requires well loose rich soil in a well drained location in the garden. Apply much and grass clippings, or straw around base of plant.

Water Requirements:

Water during dry and hot spells.

Fertilizer Requirements:

Use RootBlast, Vegetable Alive, and Slow Release Fertilizer when transplanting outdoors. Periodically apply Miracle Gro. Side dress with 33-0-0 plant food.

Harvest Tips:

Carefully pull back the husk to see if kernels are fully formed. Use a sharp knife to remove corn from stalks.


MDMV – Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus

Type: Virus - Potyvirus

Maize Dwarf Mosaic Virus is a world-wide virus disease that affects the growth of corn. Symptoms include yellowing of the leaves, then red streaks or blotches appear later in a mottle or a mosaic pattern. Plants show stunting after the infection is established. Ear formation and development may slow, which can cause substantial yield loss. The disease is spread by aphids. The disease is favorable when night temperatures are consistently around 60 F. Plan on using a 3 year crop rotation and avoid planting in the same location, year after year. Insecticides for aphids are of limited value to control the disease. Controlling Johnson grass with herbicides may be beneficial in the management of the disease. The best option is to use disease resistant varieties.

SW - Stewart's Wilt

Scientific Name: Erwinia stewartii

Type: Bacterium

Stewart's Wilt is a disease that affects the growth of corn. Stewart's wilt is common throughout the eastern regions of the United States. The disease is transmitted to corn plants during feeding by adult corn flea beetles. These beetles overwinter in the soil and upon emergence in the spring, commence feeding on the plants, and contaminates corn seedlings. An entire field of corn may become infected in a relatively short period of time. Some or all of the plants may die, and severe yield reductions result. The bacteria is carried in the digestive tract of the corn flea beetle. Beetles feeding on infected corn tissue acquire the bacteria and spread it further. Wilting of foliage is often associated with the infection, plants may be stunted, and in severe cases, death may result. When seedlings and young plants are infected, they will wilt and the main stalks may die. Symptoms include lesions on the leaves. The lesions appear as long wavy streaks that turn yellow and eventually brown. Entire leaves may die if the disease is severe and the stalks may develop fungal rot and become weaken. The disease can cause substantial yield loss due to leaf damage and weakened plants resulting from stalk rot. The infestation year to year depends largely on winter temperatures, and how many beetles carrying the disease survive the winter. Mild winter temperatures favor survival of the beetle, thus the disease can be greater the following spring. When winter temperatures are greater than 24°F during a two month period, a moderate to high risk of Stewart’s wilt is possible. Beetles carrying the bacteria that survive the winter could infect corn plants next spring. Insecticide treatments helps reduce flea beetle populations. The best option is to use hybrid disease resistant varieties.

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