Alliance Sweet Peppers pk/20

Loyalty Points: 70
SKU SP348-20
$3.75 $3.50
Availability: In Stock
Description
Planting Instructions
Disease Resistant
Customer Reviews
80 Days. Capsicum annuum. (F1) Early maturing plant produces high yields of 4" long sweet red bell peppers. Peppers turn from green to red when mature, but can be used when green. The flesh is thick and sweet. Perfect for salads, frying, grilling, roasting, and stuffing. Plant has good foliage protecting peppers from sun scald. One of the most disease resistant sweet peppers on the market. Always a great seller at Farmer’s Markets! Suitable for commercial growers. Excellent choice for home gardens, market growers, and open field production. Disease Resistance: BLS, CMV, PMV, PVY, PYMV, TMV.

Lot No: R17

Germination: 93%

Test Date: 09/19

Seeds Per Pound: 64,000

Plant Height: 24 to 36” tall

Planting Season: Spring

Sunlight Requirement: Full Sun

Planting Method: Indoor Sow

Sweet peppers
Capsicum annuum

 
Seed DepthSoil Temp. for GerminationDays to GerminationSunlight RequirementsPlanting Time
1/4" 75 F to 85 F 7 to 14 daysFull Sun Spring
USDA Hardiness ZoneSeed SpacingRow SpacingSpace After ThinningDays to Harvest
N/A 1"36 - 48" 24"60 - 90 days
Sweet Pepper Seed Planting Information:

Sweet peppers can be grown anywhere as long as you have 4 months without frost. You can also grow sweet peppers in containers. Sweet Pepper seeds are sensitive to temperature and moisture. Do not soak the seeds in any type of solution or water before planting, as this may damage the seeds and they may rot and may not germinate. Plant your seeds indoors between January and March, or 5 to 7 weeks before setting outside in garden. Use Miracle Gro Seed Starting Material for best germination results. When plant is 12" or taller, transplant them outdoors. Only plant peppers outdoors on a cloudy day, just prior to getting rain. Plant when soil is warm, at least 2 weeks after last frost, and when temperatures remain above 70 F. Please read the Tips on Growing Hot Peppers as Sweet peppers and hot peppers are grown in relatively the same manner. Plants can grow 3 to 4 ft tall.

Soil Requirements:

Requires fertile soil in a well drained location in the garden. Apply much and grass clippings, or straw around base of plant.

Water Requirements:

Water well with soaker hoses during dry and hot spells.

Fertilizer Requirements:

Use RootBlast, Vegetable Alive, and Slow Release Fertilizer when transplanting outdoors. Apply Miracle Gro every two weeks.

Harvest Tips:

Harvest sweet peppers when they are green or fully mature using a garden scissor so you don't damage the plant. Pick peppers as they mature to encourage new buds to form.


BLS – Bacterial Leaf Spot

Scientific Name: Xanthomonas campestris

Type: Bacterium

Bacterial Leaf Spot is a disease that affects the growth of peppers. It is one of most destructive diseases that affects peppers in the Eastern part of the United States. Symptoms may first develop on older plant leaves. Initially brown spots appear on the leaves. The leaves turn yellow and eventually die off. Heavy infestations may cause complete defoliation and cause sun scald. Scab like spots may develop on peppers and are unmarketable. It can cause significant yield loss and even total crops losses. The infected plants should be removed and burned to avoid further infestation. It is spread by seeds, weeds, by splashing rain, and by gardeners working with wet infected plants. Increase space between the plants to maximize air flow and drying of the leaves. The disease is favorable in areas with hot summers and frequent rainfall. Plan on using a 1 year crop rotation and avoid planting in the same location, year after year, as the disease can survive in the soil and infected plant debris. Proper tillage practices may be helpful in managing the disease. Cover the soil with black plastic mulch or black landscape fabric. Use drip irrigation or soaker hoses and avoid overhead watering. Copper fungicides can help manage the disease. The best option is to use disease-free and disease resistant varieties.

CMV – Cucumber Mosaic Virus

Type: Virus - Potyvirus

Cucumber Mosaic Virus is a world-wide virus disease that affects the growth of cantaloupes & melons, cucumbers, eggplants, gourds, peppers, pumpkins, spinach, squash, tomatoes, and watermelons. Symptoms include stunted or dwarfed plants, mottling, yellowing, distortion, and wrinkling of the leaves with the edges curling downward, and reduced growth rate and yields. The symptoms on leaves known as "shoestring" effect causes young leaves to appear narrow. The leaves will die and fall off, leaving part or most of the plant bare. The virus causes cucumbers to turn pale and gray, become bumpy and oddly shaped, and have a bitter taste. The virus causes peppers to have severe leaf damage with mosaic and necrotic rings. The peppers may have rings and spots. Tomato plants are usually stunted and have poorly shaped leaves and can cause partial or total crop loss. Plants infected with the virus have little or no marketable fruit. The virus can reduce yields and fruit quality. It is spread by aphids, seeds, and weeds. The virus overwinters in many perennial weeds. The infected plants should be removed to avoid further infestation. This virus cannot live in extremely dry conditions. The disease is favorable when temperatures are 79-89 F when aphid infestation is great. Symptoms usually begin to show in June. Plan on using a 3 year crop rotation and avoid planting in the same location, year after year. Keep the fields weed free as infected perennials can harbor the virus. Proper tillage practices may be helpful in managing the disease. Insecticides for aphids are of limited value to control the disease. Spraying the tomato plants with mineral oil can delay the aphids from spreading the virus.The best option is to use disease resistant varieties.

PMV – Pepper Mottle Virus

Type: Virus - Potyvirus

Pepper Mottle Virus is a disease that affects the growth of peppers. The disease is found in tropical and sub-tropical regions, including Florida. Symptoms include crinkled leaves, light and dark patches on the foliage that give the plant a mottled appearance, and dark green vein banding. The peppers are usually small and deformed. There may be severe stunting of the plants. The virus can cause substantial crop loss. The infected plants should be removed and burned to avoid further infestation. The virus is transmitted by aphids and is not transmitted by seeds. It is spread by aphids to nearby weeds, which act as future reservoirs for the virus, so it is important to keep the fields weed free. Insecticides for aphids can control the disease. The best option is to use disease resistant varieties.

PVMV – Potato Yellow Mosaic Virus

Type: Virus - Begomovirus

Potato Yellow Mosaic Virus is a disease that affects the growth of peppers. Symptoms include yellowing of veins, leaf malformation, leaf mottling, and wrinkled or curled leaves. The peppers may have mottled and warty areas. There may be severe stunting of the plants, and sometimes death of plants. The virus can cause substantial crop loss. The virus is transmitted by aphids. Once the plant is infected, it can be spread by farm equipment, workers, clothing, and contaminated tools. The virus survives for long periods in infected weeds. Mild winter temperatures favor survival of the virus, thus the disease can be greater the following spring. The infected plants should be removed and burned to avoid further infestation. Plan on using a 3 year crop rotation and avoid planting in the same location, year after year. Avoid working in the garden during damp conditions as it can easily spread when plants are wet. Insecticides for aphids early in the season can control the disease. Keep the fields weed free. The best option is to use disease resistant varieties.

PVY – Potato Virus Y

Type: Virus - Potyvirus

Potato Virus Y is a disease that affects the growth of peppers. Symptoms include green mosaic on leaves, leaf malformation, and leaf mottling. There may be severe stunting of the plants, and sometimes death of plants. The virus can cause substantial crop loss. The virus is transmitted by aphids. The virus survives for long periods in infected weeds. Mild winter temperatures favor survival of the virus, thus the disease can be greater the following spring. The infected plants should be removed and burned to avoid further infestation. Plan on using a 3 year crop rotation and avoid planting in the same location, year after year. Insecticides for aphids early in the season can control the disease. Keep the fields weed free. The best option is to use disease resistant varieties.

TMV – Tobacco Mosaic Virus

Type: Virus - Potyvirus

Tobacco Mosaic Virus is a world-wide virus disease that affects the growth of eggplants, peppers, and tomatoes. Tobacco mosaic virus may cause significant losses in the field and in the greenhouse. The virus does not usually kill the plant, but it does cause damage to flowers, leaves, and the tomato. Symptoms include stunted or dwarfed plants, yellow-green mottling, blistering of the leaves, a light-green and dark-green mosaic pattern on the leaves, leaf distortion and curling of the leaves, fernleafing, and reduced growth rate and yields. Blooms may have brown streaks. Pepper plants may have yellow spotting on the leaves. Slightly sunken brown rings will appear on tomatoes. The virus is spread primarily by mechanical methods. The virus is not spread by aphids. Smokers can infect plants by handling them. Gardeners contaminate the plants when they touch tobacco products or infected plants or weeds and spread the virus to healthy plants. The virus can stay alive in dead plant material for long periods of time. It can survive on infected seeds, plant debris, and even clothing for months or years. Tobacco mosaic is one of the most highly persistent tomato diseases because it can remain viable for many years and is able to withstand high heat. The virus can survive for up to 50 years in dried plant debris. The infected plants should be removed and buried or burned to avoid further infestation. Plan on using a 3 year crop rotation and avoid planting in the same location, year after year. Keep your garden weed free. Wash your hands thoroughly and disinfect tools. Try to avoid smoking while working in the garden. Spraying plants with 20 percent nonfat dry milk has been shown to be somewhat effective in preventing the spread of the virus. The best option is to use disease resistant varieties.

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